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  • Fundraise for Pets In Crisis

    14th November, 2019 | by

    You can help by fundraising for Pets In Crisis


    We strongly believe that no pets should be at risk of being abused and no one should feel that they can’t leave a violent home!

    Pets are part of our families so the the thought of leaving them behind in an emergency is unthinkable! When someone is faced with the decision of leaving a domestic and family violence situation and they have pets, the logistics of leaving can be even more frightening. They need to think of where their pet will go once they leave. Can they stay with a friend? Does their abuser know where that friend lives? The majority of womens shelters/refuges do not allow pets. If they leave the pet with the abuser, what will happen? Will it increase the risk that their pets will (if they are not already affected) become the victims of the violence? 

    If there are no safe options for their pet, our Pets In Crisis program helps. But we need your help to continue providing the service.

    There are lots of ways you can help the pets of Queenslanders who have escaped domestic and family violence. Below are just some ideas to start you thinking.

    Cutest Pet Photo Competition
    • Invite your animal loving colleagues to enter a photo of their pet into the competition.
    • Then, invite all your workmates to attend the Photo Competition, perhaps in the Tea Room, where all photos are laid out on a table, and have a jar/glass next to them.
    • Ask your workmates to place a donation into the jar next to the photo they think is the cutest.
    • The jar with the most donations, is declared the Cutest Pet.
    • Don’t forget to let us know you’re fundraising by emailing
    Pet-Owner Look-A-Like Competition
    • Invite your animal loving colleagues to enter a photo of them and their beloved pet into the competition.
    • Then, invite all your workmates to attend the Photo Competition, perhaps in the Tea Room, where all photos are laid out on a table, and have a jar/glass next to them.
    • Ask your workmates to place a donation into the jar next to the photo they think is the cutest.
    • The jar with the most donations, is declared the Winner of the Pet-Owner Look-A-Like Competition.
    • Don’t forget to let us know you’re fundraising by emailing
    Bake Sale
    • Get your bake on! Whip up your favourite cupcakes, cakes or slices and sell them at your workplace.
    • You could even encourage your workmates to do the same so you have more to share.
    • Invite your colleagues to attend the morning tea in exchange for a donation to raise funds for DVConnect to help more Queenslanders escape violent relationships.
    • Don’t forget to let us know you’re fundraising by emailing

     

    How your fundraising helps the animals

    • $26 can provide a homeless dog/cat with a warm bed, litter tray, and a meal
    • $53 could buy antibiotics for a sick dog/cat this week to help them on the road to recovery
    • $100 can help keep an RSPCA inspector on the road fighting animal cruelty for another day
    • $150 could help desex an abandoned dog/cat ready for them to find their forever home
    • $350 could provide emergency treatment for 30 cats/dogs

     

  • 10 facts about our Pets In Crisis Program

    1st July, 2019 | by

    10 facts about our Pets In Crisis Program

    1. The Pets In Crisis Program exists to care for pets whose families are escaping domestic violence.
    2. A lot of refuges do not accept pets, so many people decide to stay in a domestic violence situation for fear of what might happen to their pet if they leave. Sadly, our counsellors regularly speak to people whose intimate partners use violence or threats of it towards their pets – in order to frighten and control them into staying.
    3. Established in 2005, the Program is a collaboration between DVConnect and the RSPCA Queensland.
    4. Each pet is given safe accommodation, food, and in most cases veterinary care.
    5. The Program cares for almost 300 pets each year.
    6. BUT, last financial year we were forced to turn away 2-3 pets every week because we don’t have enough funding or safe accommodation to care for them.
    7. Pets can stay in the program for up to 28 days.
    8. Any pet is accepted, provided there is a suitable place for them to be cared for.
    9. Each pet is given a thorough health check by an RSPCA veterinarian. Sadly though, a lot of pets from domestic violence situations haven’t received the medical care they should have in their lives. This means more vet care is needed, which means more costs.
    10. The minimum cost to operate the Pets In Crisis Program is $150,000. This increases when the number of animals needing help increases. 
    11. To access this program, you must speak with the DVConnect team. Please call anytime on 1800 811 811, they are available to chat 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

     

    If you, or someone you know is experiencing domestic, family or sexual violence, DVConnect can help you find a pathway to safety, away from violence. The DVConnect helplines are:

    • Womensline 1800 811 811, available 24/7
    • Mensline 1800 600 636 available from 9am – midnight, 7 days
    • Sexual Assault Helpline 1800 010 120, available from 7.30am – 11.30pm, 7 days.
    • For more visit www.DVConnect.org.

    For more, contact 

  • Pets In Crisis

    23rd February, 2019 | by

    Pets in Crisis Program

    The Pets In Crisis program provides safe accommodation, food and vet care to pets whose families have escaped domestic and family violence, but who cannot take them to a shelter/refuge and have no family/friends who can care for their pet while they find safe, alternative accommodation. 

     

    The Facts

    • The Pets In Crisis program exists to care for pets whose families are escaping domestic and family violence.
    • The majority of refuges/shelters in Queensland do not allow pets. This results in many people staying in abusive relationships for the sake of their pets as they are scared what will happen to them if they left them with their abuser.
    • Established in 2005, the program is a collaboration between DVConnect and the RSPCA Queensland.
    • Once in the Pets In Crisis program, the RSPCA Queensland provides each pet with safe accommodation, healthy food daily, required vaccinations, microchipping and they are desexed. Also, in a lot of cases, the pet is given additional veterinary care to help pre-existing conditions that may be a result of the abuser hurting the family pet, or not allowing finances to be spent on the pet for vital yearly vaccinations or help when it is sick or injured. 
    • The Program cares for almost 300 pets each year.
    • Pets can stay in the program for up to 28 days but the average day the pets stayed in the program in 2018-19 was 34 days.
    • Any type of pet is accepted, provided there is a suitable place for them to be cared for. This could mean a cat, dog, horse, goat, guinea pig etc.
    • On average, it costs the RSPCA Queensland a minimum of $150,000 to operate the Pets In Crisis Program, this increases when the number of animals needing help increases.  If you can help by donating please do so here.

     

    How can I get my pet in the Pets In Crisis Program?

    To access this program, you must speak with the DVConnect team. Please call anytime on 1800 811 811, they are available to chat 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

     

    The link between domestic violence and pets

    Sadly pets are often abused as part of the spectrum of domestic violence. Domestic violence counsellors regularly speak with people whose pets are beaten or tortured by abusive partners. The abuser do this to frighten and control the victim into staying in the violent relationship. RSPCA Queensland’s Inspectorate frequently investigates animal cruelty cases of this nature.

    For any pet lover whose animal is part of the family – the thought of leaving them behind in an emergency is unthinkable! For hundreds of pet lovers, the decision is made all the more difficult when the need to leave is due to escalating or persistent domestic or family violence. Sadly – hundreds of women, children and their beloved pets across Queensland are constrained in violent and fearful relationships because the fear and practical challenges of leaving are just too overwhelming. These already emotionally drained and mostly financially strapped women are torn between protecting themselves and their children and the increased risk that their dear pets will (if they are not already affected) become the victims of the violence if they leave them behind

    No pets should be at risk of being abused and no one should feel that they can’t leave a violent home!

    How can this happen? 

    Places available in refuges for the victims of domestic and family violence are scarce, and in Queensland none are able to accommodate pets. DVConnect counsellors regularly speak to women whose intimate partners use violence or threats of it towards their pets – in order to frighten and control them into staying. And for the children – moving without their special companions at this time compounds the loss and makes the trauma they are facing in their family life that much more intense. Knowing that their pets will be cared for and that they can be reunited as soon as they can get back on their feet is sometimes the catalyst for many women having the courage to take that vital step towards leaving a violent domestic situation and protecting themselves their children and just as importantly their pets.

     

    How you can help

    Become a Foster Carer?

    Check out all you need to know about becoming a foster carer.

    Make a donation

    You can help by making a donation here.

       

    • How We Help

      9th July, 2020 | by

      How We Help

       

      DVConnect helps Queenslanders find pathways to safety, away from domestic, family and sexual violence. We do this by providing domestic violence help through Womensline and Mensline, as well as Sexual Assault help through operating the Queensland Sexual Assault Helpline, Trauma Counselling through 1800RESPECT, as well as help for pets through the Pets In Crisis Program. DVConnect also offers domestic, family and sexual violence education through Workplace Training. DVConnect also operate Bella’s Sanctuary a 5 unit medium-term accommodation residence that exists to provide women and children with a safe housing option after leaving a shelter/refuge.

       

      Domestic & Family Violence Help

      Womensline:  Crisis Counselling – Womensline is Queensland’s only 24/7 free, telephone state-wide service or any Queenslander identifying as a female who may be experiencing domestic and family violence. Womensline is available by calling 1800 811 811 anytime 24/7. Womensline arranges practical assistance such as emergency transport and emergency accommodation away from a violent home, as well as crisis counselling and intervention. Womensline receives one call every seven minutes. It has has been funded by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women since 2002. Read Womensline Survivor Stories

      Mensline:  Crisis Counselling – Mensline is a free, telephone crisis counselling referral, information and support line for any Queenslander identifying as male. It is available by calling 1800 600 636 between 9am – midnight, 7 days. Mensline offers counselling, referral and support for both men who are experiencing domestic violence, as well as men who are using violence in their relationships, to help them amend their behaviours. Mensline has been funded by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women since 2002. Read Mensline Feedback

       

      Sexual Assault Help

      Sexual Assault Helpline:  Counselling – The Sexual Assault Helpline is a free telephone support and counselling to any Queenslander who has been sexually assaulted or abused. It is also for those who are concerned someone they care about might have been assaulted/abused. The Sexual Assault Helpline can be accessed by calling 1800 010 120 between 7.30am – 11.30pm, 7 days. The Sexual Assault Helpline has been funded by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women since 2009. Read the Sexual Assault Survivor Stories

       

      Trauma Counselling

      1800RESPECT:  Counselling – DVConnect is a specialist trauma counselling partner of 1800RESPECT, the 24/7 National confidential online and telephone specialist counselling, information and referral service. 1800RESPECT provides support for people experiencing, or who are at risk of experiencing, sexual assault, domestic or family violence, their friends and family, as well as workers and professionals supporting someone experiencing, or at risk of experiencing violence.

       

      Help for Pets

      Pets In Crisis:  Often the safety of pets is seen as a barrier to not leaving an abusive relationship. In response to this, DVConnect operates Pets In Crisis Program in collaboration with RSPCA QLD. This program ensure pets of families who are escaping violence have safe alternative accommodation.  The program cares for the pets of families experiencing domestic violence. It provides food, safe shelter, as well as veterinary services. Last financial year Pets In Crisis cared for almost 300 pets. Our Pets in Crisis program is administered by calling DVConnect on 1800 811 811. Read the Furry Survivor Stories

       

      Workplace Training & Policy Writing

      DVConnect provides tailored workplace training on domestic, family and sexual violence. The purpose of this training is to ensure Queensland organisations are able to do their part to support their employees who may be experiencing domestic, family and/or sexual violence. DVConnect also helps organisations create Domestic and Family Violence Policies. As an accredited specialist provider of domestic and family violence services, DVConnect has a deep understanding of the complex presentations, impacts and trauma as a consequence of domestic and family violence. We have an understanding of risk, and managing this risk, in collaboration with survivors, with the intention of keeping them safe and empowered. We acknowledge the differential impacts and intersectional experience of violence in terms of prevalence, risk, severity of violence, culture. As well as identity for Indigenous women, young women, pregnant women, women who are separating, women living in regional and remote Queensland and women living with disability.

       

      Bella’s Sanctuary

      DVConnect continues to be at the forefront in providing contemporary domestic and family violence support, adapting to the changing needs of Queenslanders impacted by domestic, family and sexual violence. On 27 August 2019, DVConnect officially opened Bella’s Sanctuary, our bridging accommodation residence for longer term housing for women and children affected by domestic and family violence.  DVConnect strongly believes that domestic and family violence ends with a community-wide integrated response. Guided by this principal and a focus on reducing homelessness following domestic violence, or victims returning to their abusers, we partnered with Mirvac Residential and Queensland builders Halcyon, together with 90 building industry suppliers. Together, we designed and constructed Australia’s first commercially funded bridging accommodation residence on the Gold Coast with a total in-kind contribution of almost $1.7 million. Read feedback from Bella’s Sanctuary past residents.

       

    Thank you DVConnect for saving my Mums life, and mine. You guys getting us out of there changed everything. Thank you so much. Life is good now! 

    Our survivor has chosen to remain anonymous.

    Read Survivor Stories

    How your donation will help

    • Provides operational support to fund our bridging accommodation residence Bella's Sanctuary.
    • Provides emergency transport and accommodation for Queenslanders in crisis due to domestic and family violence.
    • Provides safety planning, crisis counselling and information to those impacted by domestic and family violence.
    • Educates Queenslanders on how to help family, friends and colleagues who have experienced, or are experiencing domestic and family violence.