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  • Survivor Stories

    4th February, 2020 | by

    Survivor Stories – Womensline

     

    Survivor Story, Tahnee* & her 4 children

    Tahnee* a 19 years old contacted the Womensline with concerns about her safety and the safety of her 4 children, all of whom were under the age of 10 years old. Having fled her house with her children and very limited belongings, Tahnee contacted us from her neighbours home and disclosed that the violence she was experiencing in the house she shared with her partner had escalated since the birth of her youngest child, only 3 weeks ago.

    When Tahnee initially contacted the Womensline, she was highly distressed and she communicated that she was terrified that her partner would come over to the neighbour’s house and force her and the children to return to the property. The Womensline counsellor and counsellor support worker were able to work as a team to manage this situation as best they could, by having one person always on the phone with Tahnee whilst the other contacted the local Women’s Centre and organised a safe and supportive place for Tahnee and her children to be and receive some face to face counselling and support with the children that was deemed essential for Tahnee at this time. DVConnect organised transport for Tahnee and the children to the local Women’s Centre. DVConnect worked closely with the staff at the Women’s Centre to ensure that Tahnee didn’t have to re-tell her story to various services, and we organised emergency motel accommodation for her and her children. That evening once settled into the motel and when feeling a lot safer, Womensline staff commented that when they spoke with Tahnee it was like speaking to a different person. Tahnee said she felt supported and safe and had been visited in the motel by a staff member from the Women’s Centre who gave her children’s clothes, nappies, food and some toys so that she had more resources than what she had fled with. Tahnee was deeply appreciative of the prompt response and support she had received through a coordinated service response facilitated by DVConnect. Tahnee and her children were successfully referred onto high security Refuge accommodation.

    DVConnect has many positive working relationships with partner agencies across Queensland, something that is particularly valuable in remote and regional areas where DVConnect can work with the partner organisations resources and local expertise. These relationships have proven to be essential in situations where women are in need of some basic material aid or face to face support, or even a comfortable place to sit with a cup of tea and feel safe for a couple of hours.

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

     

    Survivor Story, Xanthe

    Xanthe* called DVConnect very unsure of what help she could expect from us. Xanthe said that she was a devout Christian and any thought of leaving her husband was so distressing for her to contemplate and was concerned about the type of advice she might receive from someone who is not a Christian. The counsellor was able to assure her that after they talk she would be the one making the decision about her life and that all DVConnect would do is provide her the information she needed, options for her to consider and support around both. Xanthe is typical of many of the women who call DVConnect that don’t fit the ‘conventional mould’ of what many believe is a victim and a perpetrator of domestic violence. Xanthe is well educated and financially secure and comes from the part of town where it is thought that there is no domestic violence. Xanthe holds a very high level position as a financial advisor for a large firm in town but she is also married to a very highly connected man and leaving him is not only a frightening prospect because of his terrorizing control of her but also because of the shame she will feel not only within her working and social environment but also her church. She said, “No one will believe that he could do that to me not even the pastor. He presents so well”. A safety plan was put in place between the Womensline counsellor and Xanthe and it was left that if she needed further help from us she would call. Three weeks later Xanthe called DVConnect to say that she would be leaving that night and needed our help get her from the property which we did.

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

     

    Survivor Story – Amara* & her dog Bella*

    Amara*contacted the Womensline seeking information about what services DVConnect provides and how DVConnect might assist someone in her situation. Amara had been in a relationship with an abusive partner for 7 years and she had previously been in contact with the Womensline for counselling, support and information. On this most recent occasion, Amara contacted Womensline seeking immediate assistance to get to safety. When identifying potential difficulties and needs in sourcing safe accommodation, Amara stated that she had a 4 year old chihuahua rescue dog named Bella*, that she could not leave at home. In fact, part of the abuse that Amara’s partner had inflicted on her included tormenting Bella.

    Amara revealed that the idea of leaving Bella behind had been a huge barrier in her previously accessing DVConnect services beyond counselling and support, and Amara’s partner had directly threatened to harm or kill Bella if Amara ever left the relationship. The Womensline Counsellor that Amara spoke with discussed the Pets in Crisis program that DVConnect has available for women and their pets who have experienced domestic or family violence. Although initially reluctant to part from Bella for any extended period of time, Amara self-identified that whilst safety was a priority, assistance through the Pets in Crisis program was the best thing for herself and Bella and knowing that DVConnect is partnered with reputable organisations through this program including the RSPCA Queensland, Amara decided to enter Bella into the program.

    On the same day that Amara contacted the Womensline, she had an appointment at a nearby RSPCA that participates in the Pets in Crisis program. Amara signed all documents that ensured Bella would be safe in foster care over a period of a month and then Amara was assisted to emergency motel accommodation and also refuge.

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

     

    Survivor Story – Daisy*

    Our Womensline received a Police referral from a station in the Far North Queensland, seeking assistance for a First Nations female named Daisy*. The young woman had been experiencing domestic and family violence from her partner of 6 months. The violence had been escalating over the past few months. Due to living in a small remote community, her partner lived in close proximity to her (both Daisy her partner lived with their families). The Police advised that though Daisy’s partner was currently detained, there was a high likelihood he would be released within 24 hours, therefore this situation needed to be treated with a sense of urgency.

    Daisy had identified a safe family member who resided in another town, however, we were having difficulties getting in contact with them as she did not having a contact number for them. It is our process to always confirm that family or friends identified to be safe, are willing to assist an individual who has contacted us for support, prior to us facilitating travel arrangements to alternative locations. In order to contact Daisy’s family and confirm they were supportive of her staying with them, the Womensline team had to coordinate with local Police to locate the family member and confirm they were happy to have the young women stay with them.

    Having confirmed safety and sustainability of the accommodation option with her extended family member out of town, the Womensline team booked the next available flight. Local Police supported Daisy to the airport. Daisy arrived safely and is now residing with her extended family. It has been a few years since this occurred and Daisy has stayed connected to her culture and has achieved her goal of graduating from TAFE and is now employed full time.

    The collaborative action between DVConnect and local remote Police has enabled this vulnerable young woman whom has experienced significant trauma, the opportunity to live a safe life and has start her journey of healing. Daisy’s survivor story demonstrates DVConnect’s ability to quickly respond to complex circumstances, while also including culturally sensitive and appropriate practice. The initial call from Police was made less than 24 hours before Daisy was assisted with relocation to safety.

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

     

    Survivor Story – Lynette*

    A Social Worker from a regional hospital contacted the Womensline, seeking assistance for a client who had been a victim of ongoing domestic violence. Lynette was a woman in her late 60’s, and she had been experiencing abuse from her husband who was also her Carer. Lynette was financially dependent on her abusive partner therefore she had no access to money. Also, with limited mobility skills (due to her disability) in addition to the recovery process associated with injuries sustained after a combination of neglect and abuse by her husband, Lynette required access to a safe place that could also meet her care needs. In working closely with the Hospital Social Work team, DVConnect were able to identify that Lynette had an adult son who lived interstate and who was eager to support. Over the period of time that Lynette was in hospital, her son committed to setting her house up so that his mum had the aids required to support her appropriately.

    Unable to travel or live independently, DVConnect were able to assist Lynette’s son to travel to Queensland to collect his mum from the hospital. DVConnect then assisted mum and son to return to the adult son’s home interstate. Sourcing high security accommodation in the form of Shelter is not the only option that DVConnect is able to assist women into, and often times there are relatives or friends who our clients identify that are in a position where they want to and can provide their loved one with safe accommodation and support. DVConnect acknowledges that informal support networks can be essential for women’s wellbeing, and there can be a lot of value in these supports, as an alternative to when appropriate to do so.

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

     

    Survivor Story – Deema*

    DVConnect Womensline received a call from a Worker at a Queensland Hospital, seeking safe accommodation for a very vulnerable client who had been admitted following a domestic violence incident. We were advised that the client, a transgender woman, was deaf and non-verbal, communicating via written notes or texts only and she had no phone. As a further challenge it was advised that the client, Deema*, was from overseas, having entered the country on a tourist visa which had expired 2 days prior. Deema wanted to return to her country of origin, but the person using violence had taken her passport. Following the initial contact with the hospital Social Worker and other medical staff, we were able to facilitate an extended social admission for Deema due to her high level of vulnerability and to provide us with time to secure support for her on discharge. We then engaged directly with Deema and the Embassy from her country of origin to get assistance in securing a visa and passport as a matter of priority. Given Deema’s reliance on written communication, we sourced a Westnet phone and enlisted support from Centacare to deliver it directly to Deema to enable text communication. Once she had the phone set up, she was medically discharged and we booked motel accommodation and assisted her with travel to the motel.

    DVConnect worked very closely with the Embassy and the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) and Deema’s documentation was confirmed within 2 business days. Shelly was promptly on a flight home to her mother within 4 days from her initial contact with us. The following day, the Womensline team received an email from the Embassy Consular of Deema’s Embassy, simply stating: “this is amazing TEAMwork”. We also received a text message from Deema who told us that she was so happy to be reunited with her mother and she thanked us for all of the support that we provided to assist her to safety. DVConnect’s strengths lie in our ability to respond quickly, think laterally and act collaboratively, in order to provide an individualised and sensitive response to women seeking safety in this dynamic and still emerging global world.

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

     

    Survivor Story, Maddie*

    Maddie* is a young woman living on one of the islands in the Torres Strait with her partner, their twin girls and his family. Maddie’s family are from another island so she had no supports of her own. Her partner attacked her the night before and she and the twins were at a health clinic. Her partner has disappeared and the police will not find him as he will hide until they go and return to Thursday Island so it is not safe for her to stay. Maddie would like to go to her family where she will be safe. Her family want her returned to them. DVConnect arranged a flight for Maddie and the twins leaving the following morning. The health clinic agreed to look after Maddie with the help of the local community police who would protect her until she was safely on the plane. DVConnect arranges up to four flights a week from the remote parts of the state including the Torres Strait, Gulf region to get women to safety. 

    *Name and location have been changed to protect our client’s identity.

  • Furry Survivor Stories

    29th January, 2020 | by

    Pets in Crisis – Furry Survivor Stories

     

    Our Pets In Crisis program provides safe accommodation, food and vet care to pets whose families have escaped domestic and family violence, but who cannot take them to a shelter/refuge and have no family/friends who can care for their pet while they find safe, alternative accommodation. 

     

    Beanie & Frankie’s Furry Survivor Story

    Beanie and Frankie’s* Mum Iris* was delighted to have her two furry babies back in her care after she left hospital. Iris unfortunately found herself admitted into hospital after her ex-partner had physically assaulted her so badly that she was knocked unconscious. Her neighbours had heard Iris arguing with a male and the dogs barking excessively, so they had called the Police, which is when she was found and taken to hospital by an ambulance. Iris expressed her gratitude to the foster carers who looked after Beanie and Frankie for many reasons. One reason in particular was that their foster carers had given them regular professional pet grooming hair cuts. Iris said that when she lived with her ex-partner she was not able to access any of their finances, even though she had a full time job. (This is called Financial Abuse). Her abuser didn’t allow her to spend money on Beanie and Frankie, other than food so professional pet grooming would have been out of the question. When Beanie and Frankie were first admitted into the Pets In Crisis program they received all the vaccinations and medications required to safeguard them from potentially serious and sometimes fatal diseases. They were desexed and they were microchipped.

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

     

    Millie’s Furry Survivor Story

    Millie needed the Pets In Crisis Program foster care accommodation for 2 months. When she first arrived she also needed veterinary attention in the form of her C5 (Kennel Cough) injection, her heart worm injection, as well as flea and tick medication. She was then placed in a foster care home with another dog, of similar size and age to her.  Millie’s reunion with her family was an emotional one. It represented a new beginning and a new life with her family that would be free from violence. Millie’s Mum told the Pets in Crisis Program volunteers that “she didn’t know if she could leave the violent situation she used to be in because she was scared about what would happen to her precious girl Millie.” She went on to add that she is so grateful for this program.

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

     

    Roxanna’s Furry Survivor Story

    Roxanna* is a little Maltese cross weighing only 4kg. Roxanna and her mum had been living with domestic and family violence. Roxanna’s Mum made the courageous decision to leave her abusive partner and needed somewhere safe for Roxanne to go while she fled to safety herself. She called the DVConnect Womensline and Roxanna was admitted into the Pets In Crisis Program. After a tearful goodbye with her Mum, Roxanna headed to the RSPCA Wacol Animal Hospital where she was given a clean bill of health. That night would have been a very scary one for little Roxanna but the vet staff kept a close eye on her and tried to alleviate her nervousness.

    The next day Roxanna was the perfect patient as she had her desex surgery. Over the next two days, little Roxanna waited for her behavioral assessment. But she was very anxious and refused to eat. The stress of the shelter environment was just too much for her. That’s when we needed a staff member to step up and agree to take her home straight away. No more time in the kennels for this sweet girl. This is how Roxanna ended up being placed with a loving foster carer named Anna*.  Anna said “When I first brought her inside my house, she wasn’t very confident. She was a little unsure of the resident cats and Chihuahua. She had to be hand-fed roast chicken to get her to eat. But she took an instant shine to my partner. Stuck to her like glue! Over the passing weeks, we saw a great transformation in Roxanna. She was outgoing and playful. She even tried to entice my very sedate Chihuahua into games. She was cheeky and funny. And she was eating like a horse! I think she settled into my place really well. Roxanna’s mum ended up needing another 28 days of emergency boarding. But I didn’t mind.  I loved caring for this little madam. When it was time to bring her back to the RSPCA Queensland so that her mum could collect her, there were definitely a lot of mixed feelings. When I saw the reunion between Roxanna and her mum, I knew that this was working out exactly as it should. Roxanna’s mum was so happy and so grateful to us for caring for her girl. She grabbed my hand and kept saying “thank you, thank you so much”. Roxanna was ecstatic to see her mum again, her little body squirmed in excitement and her tail wagged uncontrollably. It truly made this whole process worthwhile.”

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

     

    Missy’s Furry Survivor Story

    Sharon* and her children were subjected to domestic violence and abuse. Sharon reached out to DVConnect and expressed she wanted assistance to leave a violent household. Sharon and her children were assisted into safe house accommodation. Naturally Sharon was anxious about leaving Missy, the family dog, with RSPCA Queensland, and was concerned about how Missy would cope with the change in environment. RSPCA Queensland reassured Sharon that Missy would be well cared for through a kind and professional service, and they would be reunited in 28 days. Missy was taken into RSPCA Queensland care and supported by animal attendants and vet clinics to have a physical exam, vaccinations and to be de-wormed. Missy was de-sexed and cleared to proceed to the behavioural assessment stage. In the behavioural assessment stage she was cleared for safety handling, separation anxiety and given the tick that meant she was suitable for foster. While assessment took place, Missy was given twice daily walks and cuddles to ensure she received regular exercise and human connection. Missy was placed with foster carers John and Jenny. John and Jenny were aware she was a Pets In Crisis dog and she had been exposed to a violent environment. Missy’s foster carers were patient as she settled into a routine of regular walks. John and Jenny regularly provided updates to Sharon about how Missy was settling confidently into her new routine. Missy’s stay with John and Jenny was extended by 28 days because of Sharon’s need for more time. Missy was in foster care for 2 months and the family reunion with Missy, Sharon and Sharon’s children was emotional because it represented a new beginning as a family. Sharon was grateful and said to John and Jenny, ‘Thank you so much for looking after my girl. I don’t know what I would have done without this program’.

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

     

    Marble’s Furry Survivor Story

    Chen* contacted the Womensline seeking information about what services DVConnect provides and how DVConnect might assist someone in her situation. Chen had been in a relationship with an abusive partner for 7 years and she had previously been in contact with the Womensline for counselling, support and information. On this most recent occasion, Chen contacted Womensline seeking immediate assistance to get to safety. When identifying potential difficulties and needs in sourcing safe accommodation, Chen stated that she had a 4 year old staffy cross dog named Marble*, that she could not leave at home. In fact, part of the abuse that Chen’s partner had inflicted on her included tormenting Marble. Chen revealed that the idea of leaving Marble behind had been a huge barrier in her previously accessing DVConnect services beyond counselling and support, and Chen’s partner had directly threatened to harm or kill Marble if Chen ever left the relationship. The Womensline Counsellor that Chen spoke with discussed the Pets in Crisis program that DVConnect has available for women and their pets who have experienced domestic or family violence. Although initially reluctant to part from Marble for any extended period of time, Chen self-identified that whilst safety was a priority, assistance through the Pets in Crisis program was the best thing for herself and Marble, and knowing that DVConnect is partnered with reputable organisations through this program including the RSPCA Queensland, Chen decided to enter Marble into the program. On the same day that Chen contacted the Womensline, she had an appointment at a nearby RSPCA that participates in the Pets in Crisis program. Chen signed all documents that ensured Marble would be safe in foster care over a period of a month and then Chen was assisted to emergency motel accommodation and also refuge.

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

  • Gift in Will

    24th December, 2019 | by

    Leaving a Gift in your Will or Bequest

    Giving a charitable gift in your name or in honour of a loved one can mean the world of difference as we work towards a future free from domestic, family and sexual violence.

    How your gift will help

    • Provide emergency transport to Queenslanders escaping a violent home
    • Provide emergency accommodation to Queenslanders who have escaped domestic, family and sexual violence.
    • Provide safe accommodation, food and veterinary care for pets of families who have fled violence with until they can be united with their family.
    • Education and awareness campaigns to ensure more Queenslanders understand what constitutes domestic violence and that we can help them find a pathway to safety.

     

    DVConnect’s commitment to you

    Our vision is for all relationships to be free from domestic, family and sexual violence. When people like you entrust us with a gift in your will, these are the assurances we make:

    1. We understand that your will is a personal document; one that requires time and careful planning to complete.
    2. We understand that a change in your circumstances may require a change to your Will.
    3. We will work with all parties handling your gift with care, sensitivity and respect to ensure your wishes are met.
    4. We will honour and respect your privacy and your decision regarding your chosen level of engagement and communication with us.
    5. We will invest your gift responsibly to extend our reach into the community so your gift has a direct contribution to helping Queenslanders escape domestic, family and sexual violence.
    6. We will be forever thankful and remember you for the enduring support you are giving to so many others.

     

    Wording for your Will

    We recommend that you seek legal advice in the preparation of your Will to ensure that it is legally valid and accurately reflects your wishes.  It is important to remember to review your will regularly, particularly when life circumstances change. There are a number of ways of making provision for DVConnect in your Will.  

     

    A Bequest

    A ‘bequest’ is a gift of a sum of money or an asset that is made in your Will before the balance of the estate is distributed. When making a bequest to DVConnect, you can make a general bequest or a specific bequest.  A general bequest is a bequest that is not expressed to be for any particular purpose. A specific bequest is one that is directed to a particular program or service offered. In the case of DVConnect, the following are some examples of programs that a specific bequest can be directed to:

    • Womensline
    • Mensline
    • Sexual Assault Helpline
    • Pets In Crisis
    • Bella’s Sanctuary

    You should ensure that a specific bequest clause is drafted to allow flexibility of purpose should a particular project or program no longer exist when your estate is administered.

     

    A Residual Gift

     A residual gift refers to a gift of the whole or part of the remaining balance of the estate after all estate liabilities and bequests have been made. A residual gift is often expressed in percentage terms. Like a bequest, a residual gift can also be general or specific in nature.

     

    Examples of Wording

    Below are three examples of suggested wording to accommodate the most bequest and residual gifts in your Will.

    1. A General Bequest
    • “I give, free of all duties and taxes, the amount of $ or my units/shares in Trust/Ltd, or my real property situated at [insert street address] having the title reference to DVConnect Limited, PO Box 10575, Brisbane 4000 for its general purposes;
    • If DVConnect has ceased to exist or has changed its name or has amalgamated with another organisation, this gift shall not fail but my executor and trustee shall pay it to the organisation that they consider most nearly fulfils the objects that I intend to benefit;
    • The receipt of the Company Secretary or other authorised officer for the time being shall constitute a full and sufficient discharge to my executor and trustee;
    • My executor and trustee shall not be obliged to see or to enquire into the application of money or assets, the subject of such gift.”

     

    1. A Specific Bequest
    •  “I give, free of all duties and taxes, the amount of $ or my units/shares in Trust/Ltd, or my real property situated at [insert street address] having the title reference to DVConnect Limited, PO Box 10575, Brisbane 4000 to be applied for [specify the area, project or program that you intend to benefit]
    • If DVConnect has ceased to exist or has changed its name or has amalgamated with another organisation, or the specific purpose to which the gift is directed no longer exists, this gift shall not fail but my executor and trustee shall pay it to the organisation or and purpose that they consider most nearly fulfils the objects that I intend to benefit;
    • The receipt of the Company Secretary or other authorised officer for the time being shall constitute a full and sufficient discharge to executor and trustee;
    • My executor and trustee shall not be obliged to see or to enquire into the application of money or assets, the subject of such gift.”

      

    1. A Residual Gift
    • “I give, free of all duties and taxes, the residue of my estate (or % of the residue of my estate) to DVConnect Limited, PO Box 10575, Brisbane 4000…..
    • Select one of the below:

    …to be applied for its general purposes;

    OR

    …to be applied for [specify the area, project or program that you intend to benefit]

    • If DVConnect has ceased to exist or has changed its name or has amalgamated with another organisation, or the specific purpose to which the gift is directed no longer exists, this gift shall not fail but my executor and trustee shall pay it to the organisation or and purpose that they consider most nearly fulfils the objects that I intend to benefit;
    • The receipt of the Company Secretary or other authorised officer for the time being shall constitute a full and sufficient discharge to executors and trustees;
    • My executors and trustees shall not be obliged to see or to enquire into the application of money or assets, the subject of such gift.”

     

    Download Gift In Will – Bequest – DVConnect – as of January 2020

     

    Professional advice from a Solicitor

    We recommend that you seek advice from a solicitor to ensure that the wording of your Will reflects your exact wishes. Solicitors who support DVConnect are:

    Maurice Blackburn

    Offices in: Brisbane, Browns Plains, Bundaberg, Caboolture, Cairns, Gold Coast, Ipswich, Mackay, Rockhampton, Strathpine, Sunshine Coast, Toowoomba, Townsville. Visiting Solicitors in: Ayr, Cleveland, Gladstone, Gympie, Ingham, Innisfail, Mareeba, Mount Isa. 

    Phone:             1800 621 880, 24/7

    Learn more about Maurice Blackburn

     

    YHC Lawyers

    Address:          Level 15, 100 Edwards Street, Brisbane QLD 4000

    Phone:             07 3160 3315

     

    If you would like to discuss a Gift in your Will further, please email

  • Become a Foster Carer

    12th November, 2019 | by

    How you can become a foster carer

    Thank you for your interest in becoming a foster carer of Pets In Crisis pets. Our Pets In Crisis Program is co-ordinated by the RSPCA Queensland. Therefore all foster caring is controlled by them. The RSPCA Queensland is always keen to work with enthusiastic, compassionate people who would like to help give an animal a second chance at a safe and happy life.  Foster carers are unique individuals who dedicate their time to nurturing and loving those who need it most. 

    Pets In Crisis animals

    Pets in Crisis is a critical program that delivers many community benefits. It provides those who are experiencing domestic and family abuse with peace of mind that their pet will be away from violence and harm while they find a safe environment to rebuild their lives. Sadly pets are often abused as part of the spectrum of domestic violence. Domestic violence counsellors regularly speak with people whose pets are beaten or tortured by abusive partners. Places available in refuges for the victims of domestic and family violence are scarce, and in Queensland none are able to accommodate pets. DVConnect counsellors regularly speak to women whose intimate partners use violence or threats of it towards their pets – in order to frighten and control them into staying. And for the children – moving without their special companions at this time compounds the loss and makes the trauma they are facing in their family life that much more intense. Knowing that their pets will be cared for and that they can be reunited as soon as they can get back on their feet is sometimes the catalyst for many women having the courage to take that vital step towards leaving a violent domestic situation and protecting themselves their children and just as importantly their pets.

    How do I become an RSPCA Foster Carer?

    • Be over 18 years of age.
    • Read through our FAQs page.
    • Complete the Foster Carer Expression of Interest form.
    • Attend a 2 hour Basic Foster Care Training session at your local RSPCA shelter or adoption centre. Bring copies of your own dog and cat vaccination certificates and, if renting, written permission to have animals from the home owner or real estate agent.
    • At the Basic Foster Care Training session, complete a Foster Carer Information form (this gathers all of your personal details, as well as your preferences for the types of animals you’d like to foster).
    • Allow a visit by one of our volunteer property checkers to double-check the suitability of your home.
    • If all requirements are met, wait to be matched to a suitable animal.
    • If fostering an adult dog, attend a “meet and greet” with your new foster animal at the shelter or adoption centre, bringing along your own dogs and all children in the household.
    • Sign a Foster Carer Agreement form for every new animal you foster.

     

     

Thank you DVConnect for saving my Mums life, and mine. You guys getting us out of there changed everything. Thank you so much. Life is good now! 

Our survivor has chosen to remain anonymous.

Read Survivor Stories

How your donation will help

  • Provides operational support to fund our bridging accommodation residence Bella's Sanctuary.
  • Provides emergency transport and accommodation for Queenslanders in crisis due to domestic and family violence.
  • Provides safety planning, crisis counselling and information to those impacted by domestic and family violence.
  • Educates Queenslanders on how to help family, friends and colleagues who have experienced, or are experiencing domestic and family violence.