QUICK EXIT

Search Results for: pets in crisis

  • 10 facts about our Pets In Crisis Program

    1st July, 2019 | by

    10 facts about our Pets In Crisis Program

    1. The Pets In Crisis Program exists to care for pets whose families are escaping domestic violence.
    2. A lot of refuges do not accept pets, so many people decide to stay in a domestic violence situation for fear of what might happen to their pet if they leave. Sadly, our counsellors regularly speak to people whose intimate partners use violence or threats of it towards their pets – in order to frighten and control them into staying.
    3. Established in 2005, the Program is a collaboration between DVConnect and the RSPCA Queensland.
    4. Each pet is given safe accommodation, food, and in most cases veterinary care.
    5. The Program cares for almost 300 pets each year.
    6. BUT, last financial year we were forced to turn away 2-3 pets every week because we don’t have enough funding or safe accommodation to care for them.
    7. Pets can stay in the program for up to 28 days.
    8. Any pet is accepted, provided there is a suitable place for them to be cared for.
    9. Each pet is given a thorough health check by an RSPCA veterinarian. Sadly though, a lot of pets from domestic violence situations haven’t received the medical care they should have in their lives. This means more vet care is needed, which means more costs.
    10. The minimum cost to operate the Pets In Crisis Program is $150,000. This increases when the number of animals needing help increases. 
    11. To access this program, you must speak with the DVConnect team. Please call anytime on 1800 811 811, they are available to chat 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

     

    If you would like to donate to our Pets In Crisis Program we would be so very grateful.

    Donate Now

    If you or someone you know needs help, please call us:

    Womensline 1800 811 811
    Mensline 1800 600 636
    Sexual Assault Line 1800 010 120
    1800RESPECT 1800 737 732
  • Donate to Pets In Crisis

    4th June, 2019 | by
    Pets in Crisis 0 read more

    Donate to Pets In Crisis

     

    Thank you for choosing to donate to our Pets In Crisis Program. It’s only because of donations like yours that we can continue to run our Pets In Crisis Program. It is so important to us to be able to help the voiceless animals who are unfortunately involved in domestic and family violence situations. They rely on our help. They can’t pick up the phone and call us, or call the Police. So it is up to us to be their voice and help them.

    It costs over $150,000 per year to run the Pets In Crisis Program any donation you can spare will help towards keeping our program running.

    How your donation helps:

    • $20 will shelter an abandoned pet tonight

    • $60 can provide a warm and safe bed for a homeless pet tonight

    • $120 will heal wounds and soothe aches for a neglected pet

    • $250 can fill the tummies of 175 shelter pets tonight

    Donate Now

  • Pets In Crisis

    23rd February, 2019 | by

    Pets in Crisis Program

    The Pets In Crisis Program provides safe accommodation, food and vet care to pets whose families have escaped domestic violence, but who cannot take them to a refuge. 

     

    THE FACTS

    • The Pets In Crisis Program exists to care for pets whose families are escaping domestic violence.
    • Established in 2005, the Program is a collaboration between DVConnect and the RSPCA Queensland.
    • Each pet is given safe accommodation, food, and in most cases veterinary care.
    • The Program cares for almost 300 pets each year.
    • BUT, due of lack of funds and accommodation space, we are forced to say no to almost 200 more pets who need help. This breaks our hearts.
    • Pets can stay in the program for up to 28 days.
    • Any pet is accepted, provided there is a suitable place for them to be cared for.
    • Each pet is given a thorough health check by an RSPCA veterinarian. Sadly though, a lot of pets from domestic violence situations haven’t received the medical care they should have in their lives. This means more vet care is needed, which means more costs. Examples of a basic vet check-up for a dog include the dog being given flea, tick and worming medication, heartworm, as well as kennel cough injections. Also a lot of cases require specialist veterinary operations due to abuse the animal has suffered at the hand of the domestic violence abuser. 
    • The minimum cost to operate the Pets In Crisis Program is $150,000. This increases when the number of animals needing help increases. 

     

    DONATE TO PETS IN CRISIS

    We are forced to decline 2-3 pets every week because we do not have enough funds to provide safe beds, food and vet care for them. Any donation you can make is so very much appreciated. 

    Donate Now

    How your donation helps:

    • $20 will shelter an abandoned pet tonight

    • $60 can provide a warm and safe bed for a homeless pet tonight

    • $120 will heal wounds and soothe aches for a neglected pet

    • $250 can fill the tummies of 175 shelter pets tonight

    Pets in Crisis is a critical program that delivers many community benefits. It provides those who are experiencing domestic and family abuse with peace of mind that their pet will be away from violence and harm while they find a safe environment to rebuild their lives.

    • If you are in a position to donate, we would be so grateful.
    • If you are a master fundraiser and have an idea you think could raise funds amongst your friends or workmates, please give it a go, we, and the animals would be so appreciative.
    • If you work for a company who might be willing to donate, please ask them if they are interested.
    • If you are involved in a community group who may like to fundraise, we would be so very grateful.

     

    How can I get my pet in the Pets In Crisis Program?

    To access this program, you must speak with the DVConnect team. Please call anytime on 1800 811 811, they are available to chat 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

     

    The link between domestic violence and pets

    Sadly pets are often abused as part of the spectrum of domestic violence. Domestic violence counsellors regularly speak with people whose pets are beaten or tortured by abusive partners. The abuser do this to frighten and control the victim into staying in the violent relationship. RSPCA Queensland’s Inspectorate frequently investigates animal cruelty cases of this nature. Research shows that up to 25% of people in violent situations, who have a family pet present, may remain in that situation because of concern for the welfare of their pet should they leave.

    For any pet lover whose animal is part of the family – the thought of leaving them behind in an emergency is unthinkable! For hundreds of pet lovers, the decision is made all the more difficult when the need to leave is due to escalating or persistent domestic or family violence. Sadly – hundreds of women, children and their beloved pets across Queensland are constrained in violent and fearful relationships because the fear and practical challenges of leaving are just too overwhelming. These already emotionally drained and mostly financially strapped women are torn between protecting themselves and their children and the increased risk that their dear pets will (if they are not already affected) become the victims of the violence if they leave them behind

    No pets should be at risk of being abused and no one should feel that they can’t leave a violent home!

    How can this happen? 

    Places available in refuges for the victims of domestic and family violence are scarce, and in Queensland none are able to accommodate pets. DVConnect counsellors regularly speak to women whose intimate partners use violence or threats of it towards their pets – in order to frighten and control them into staying. And for the children – moving without their special companions at this time compounds the loss and makes the trauma they are facing in their family life that much more intense. Knowing that their pets will be cared for and that they can be reunited as soon as they can get back on their feet is sometimes the catalyst for many women having the courage to take that vital step towards leaving a violent domestic situation and protecting themselves their children and just as importantly their pets.

     

    THE FURRY STORIES

    01

    Pets In Crisis 2
    Beanie & Frankie’s Story

    Beanie and Frankie’s Mum Iris was delighted to have her two furry babies Beanie and Frankie back in her care after she left hospital. Iris unfortunately found herself in hospital after her ex-partner had physically assaulted her. Iris expressed her gratitude to the foster carers who looked after Beanie and Frankie for many reasons. One reason in particular was that they gave them regular professional pet grooming hair cuts. Iris said that she previously did not spend money on pet grooming because her ex-partner controlled the finances and would not let her get a job. 

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

    02

    Pets in Crisis 2
    Millie’s Story

    Millie needed the Pets In Crisis Program foster care accommodation for 2 months. When she first arrived she also needed veterinary attention in the form of her C5 (Kennel Cough) injection, her heart worm injection, as well as flea and tick medication. She was then placed in a foster care home with another dog, of similar size and age to her.  Millie’s reunion with her family was an emotional one. It represented a new beginning and a new life with her family that would be free from violence. Millie’s Mum told the Pets in Crisis Program volunteers that “she didn’t know if she could leave the violent situation she used to be in because she was scared about what would happen to her precious girl Millie.” She went on to add that she is so grateful for this program.

    *Names have been changed. Pets in images are models.

  • Safety Planning

    7th July, 2019 | by

    Whether you are staying in order to prepare for the right time to leave, or you have left, we can help you with essential safety tips.

     

    If you are staying:

    If you are staying in the relationship, think about what you can do to keep yourself safe, particularly at times when your partner becomes abusive, or you sense the situation is escalating. 

    • Create ‘signals’ for supportive neighbours, family or friends that let them know to come over or to call for help. For example, switch on a particular light, leave a curtain blind closed /open, phone or text a friend with an agreed cue or a message that will be a prompt or code for them to help in whatever way you have discussed.
    • Keep essential items like spare keys, money and important documents or copies of them, where you can get to them easily quickly.
    • Plan and practice (with your children) how you might escape from your home safely and quickly. Think about the safest exits so that when you feel that things are getting out of control you can leave quickly.
    • If possible, keep weapons and knives locked up or inaccessible (e.g. remove knife-blocks from kitchen benches).
    • Let trusted friends, family or neighbours know about the abuse and let them know about your safety plan.
    • Have a code (perhaps a word or phrase) that you can use with someone you trust by phone or text so they know you are in danger and need help from them or the police.
    • Teach your children that their responsibility during an incident is to stay safe – not to rescue you.
    • Program the police, taxi company, local support service and a family member’s or friend’s number into the speed dial on your phone.
    • Plan where you will go and how you will get there in case you need to leave in a hurry.
    • If possible, keep a Safety Diary. Record any instances of abuse, and try to include details, dates, times and photos. You may want to keep your Safety Diary at your doctor’s office, a friend’s house or electronically but remember to make sure it is secure (you could use a password, email it to someone you trust or hide it under another name).
    • Keep text messages your partner sends to you, and save online messages or posts made by your partner.
    • Ask a family member or friend if they can take care of your pets at their house, or regularly take the pets for walks.

     

    Helping your children

    You can help your child emotionally recover from domestic violence in many ways:

    • Protect children from violence by taking them to a safe place.
    • Get support to take action against the violence, this will show them that violence is not acceptable.
    • Reassure the child that none of the violent episodes were their fault in any way.
    • Tell them how much you love them and cuddle them often.
    • Encourage them to talk openly about their feelings.
    • Get extra help for your child if necessary.
    • Enlist a professional from a specialist domestic and family violence service to help provide your child with emotional support.
    • Tell the child that abusive behaviour is wrong and be a role model for other ways of managing anger and solving problems.
    • Seek professional help, such as counselling, for all family members.

     

    Helping your pets

    Together with the RSPCA Queensland we operate the Pets In Crisis Program.

    • Call us and ask about our Pets In Crisis Program. Call 1800 811 811 anytime.
    • Read more, or watch a video about our Pets In Crisis Program. Learn More.

     

    If you are planning to leave:

    • Hide a bag with clothes, medication, keys and other important items that you can either exit with easily or leave with someone you trust.
    • Put aside some money for travel expenses, accommodation and food if you have access to money.
    • Make copies of important documents, e.g. car registration, tax file number, title deeds, loan records, Medicare card, drivers licence, account details, prescriptions, passports etc and leave them with someone you trust or take photos of them and store them securely.
    • Take small items you may be able to sell, like jewellery.
    • If you have children take clothes for them, medical records and medication, bottles and some of their favourite toys.
    • If you have pets, take food and equipment needed for travelling (e.g. leash, cage, documentation).

     

    If you have left:

    The time after leaving an domestic violence situation can be very dangerous. The below tips help reduce this risk but you should be very vigalent during this time.

    • Report to police and apply for an ADVO.
    • If you have an ADVO carry a copy of it with you at all times and give a copy of it and a photo of your partner to your workplace and your children’s school so that they are aware of the situation.
    • Redirect your mail and get a post office box.
    • Only give your new address and phone number to those you really trust.
    • Get a new SIM card and phone and turn your call preferences set to Private so your new number cannot be saved.
    • Think about getting a spare SIM card or phone if you want to communicate with your ex-partner about children or pets.
    • Wherever possible, change your regular patterns of movement, e.g. travel to and from work by a different route, buy your groceries at a different shop, change the time and maybe location of regular appointments, maybe move your children to a new day care centre or school.
    • Ensure where you are staying is as safe as possible, e.g. security doors, lockable windows, motion- sensitive external lights etc.
    • Let key people know about your situation, e.g. your boss and other work colleagues, your children’s teachers, so they know not to give out your details or they can screen your calls etc.
    • Continue to seek support from the domestic and family violence services and medical practitioners during this time.
    • Block your partner on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, WhatsApp and any other forms of social media or communication. Consider setting up a new profile that is secure.  Read through Facebook and other social media platforms Safety Tips.

    Safety Planning is essential, please call us on 1800 811 811 if you would like to discuss any of the above.

I wish to sincerely thank you and the entire DVConnect team for their past and present assistance during these past few years of family turmoil. Without such a wonderful service it would be that much harder for women and children.

Jenny, Northgate Brisbane

We need your support.

With your donation we can:

  • Provide more emergency transport and accommodation to those escaping violence.
  • Provide more temporary accommodation for pets whose families have escaped domestic violence, until they set up a permanent home.
  • Provide more specialist counselling to those who have experienced domestic violence and/or sexual assault.
  • Educate the community about how we can help them, or someone they love, escape a domestically abusive relationship.